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Residential Options

[big-title] Residential Options: Bootcamp![/big-title]
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Person-Centered Planning

[p]“Person-Centered
Planning” is a way of thinking that focuses on the dreams, outcomes, and visions of the individual. It is
a process guided by an individual’s and family’s unique vision, likes, and dislikes. Person-Centered
Planning focuses on the people and families rather than programs, and is a way to bring together
everyone important to the person: family, friends, neighbors, support workers, and other professionals. Planning should start early so a transition isn't sudden.[/p]
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[li-row]Where does the person want to live? [/li-row]
[li-row]What do they need to be happy? [/li-row]
[li-row]Can he or she live alone or is support needed? [/li-row]
[li-row]How much support does he or she need now?[/li-row]
[li-row]Are there any health and safety issues to consider? [/li-row]
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[li-row]Will they need to live close to family as part of his or her support system? [/li-row]
[li-row]Would the individual like to live by him- or herself or with roommates?[/li-row]
[li-row]What are the characteristics of those who will best support the person?[/li-row]
[li-row]What kinds of housing options are available in the community?[/li-row]
[li-row]What is the neighborhood like? Is the residence accessible? Is it affordable? Is it near
transportation?[/li-row] [/list-ul]
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Factors to Consider

[p]Some of the essential factors to consider are education, individualized training,
successful employment, and an integrated life in the community.Addressing the person’s joys and fears will be a
necessary part of the process. Discussing fearful situations they might encounter being on his or her own
can help to plan for social, safety, and economic concerns such as the ability to maintain the appropriate
supports, separation from the family, vulnerability, social isolation, and the ability to be employed. It is
important to examine what is making the individual fearful.
It is often difficult to find a place to live that is affordable, accessible, available, and where the person
wants to live. Also, additional supports for young adults are often complicated and costly. Each
individual is unique. There is no model for obtaining housing and support. One should consider: [/p]
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[li-row]Their vision and plan[/li-row]
[li-row]The individual’s resources — wages, trusts, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security
Disability Insurance (SSDI), county services, Medical Assistance, Home and Community-based
waivers [/li-row]
[li-row]The family’s resources — financial commitment, time, energy, and networks [/li-row]
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[li-row]Community resource options — availability of suitable housing, community development,
accessible housing, low-income or Section 8 housing[/li-row]
[li-row]State resources — financial support, state housing agency and planners, state disability
resources [/li-row]
[li-row]Location of housing: Could be in unsafe environment, not near public transportation or too far away from employment or family[/li-row]
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Can the individual live on their own? Or live on their own with support services?

[p]Depending on the abilities of the special needs individual, he or she could live independently depending on their situation. It is possible that he or she only need a little support which can be provided to them through government assistance or private pay. Housing could be home ownership, apartment rental, condominium and townhome rental or ownership or cooperative housing.[/p]
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A Group Home Environment

[p]A Group home may be run by a nonprofit or for-profit company or run by a local government where individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities will live together. The Group Home is usually staffed 24 hours a day. Depending on where you live, there may be restrictions on how many individuals can live in the home and where the home can be located. Most group homes must follow strict legal guidelines on caring for the residents and have government oversight. The group home will provide housing and meals, and may provide other activities to residents or transport them to activities or to work. Each group home is different in what it provides and how the services are structured.[/p]
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Living with Family, Friends or Relatives

[p]It may be possible for the individual to continue to live at home with his or her parents. There may come a time where the parents can no longer care for the individual though. If other family members or friends wish to take the person in to their home then that could possible provide a solution to housing. Possible solutions could be to build an addition onto the family member's house or build an in-law suite.[/p]
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Adult Foster Care or Family Living

[p]Lifesharing offers an individual with a disability the opportunity to live with a family or individual who will support his or her desires and needs for everyday life. The family or individual opens their homes to the individual in the hopes that he or she becomes a member of the household and provides continuity in their life. The family or individual does receive a stipend for caring for the disabled individual.
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Reverse Lifesharing is when a family or individual would move into the disabled individual's home. This could occur if the disabled individual already has housing and would need live-in support. Again the family or individual would receive a stipend to move in. This does provide more power for the disabled individual because if the situation is not working the family or individual would have to move out and the disabled individual would stay in his or her home.[/p]
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Cohousing Living

[p]Cohousing is a type of collaborative housing in which residents actively participate in the design and operation of their own neighborhoods.
Cohousing residents are consciously committed to living as a community. The physical design encourages both social contact and individual space. Private homes contain all the features of conventional homes, but residents also have access to extensive common facilities such as open space, courtyards, a playground and a common house.
The environment is supposed to foster the need for community members to take care of common property builds a sense of working together, trust and support. Because neighbors hold a commitment to a relationship with one another, almost all cohousing communities use consensus as the basis for group decision-making.[/p]
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Living in a Nursing Home

[p]Some retirement communities and nursing homes are broadening their resident pool by reaching out to those who have a disability. Since similar supports are already available to residents, an individual with a disability could be provided a supportive and structured housing arrangement.[/p]
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Intermediate Care Facility

[p]Intermediate Care Facilities for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities is an optional Medicaid benefit that enables States to provide comprehensive and individualized health care and rehabilitation services to individuals to promote their functional status and independence. Although it is an optional benefit, all States offer it, if only as an alternative to home and community-based services waivers for individuals. Each state will have its own rules on the criteria to be eligible for such housing. [/p]
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[big-title2]Kokua Network goes to great lengths to provide accurate information. Kokua Network is not rendering legal, tax, accounting or other professional advice or services and you should talk to a attorney, accountant or any other professional local to your area who is knowledgeable of the rules and regulations that apply in your unique situation. Kokua Network should be used as a general guide only.[/big-title2]