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SSI and SSDI

[big-title] SSI and SSDI: Bootcamp![/big-title]
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What is a Supplemental Security Income or SSI?

[p]SSI is a federal supplement program that gives monthly payments to individuals who have low income and few resources and who are age 65 or old, blind or disabled.[/p]
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What are the SSI eligibility requirements

[p]in order to be eligible, you need to have limited income and few resources in addition to the disability. An individual is considered disabled by Social Security if they have a physical or mental condition (or a combination of conditions) that keeps the person from working and the condition is expected to last at least 12 months or result in death. When applying it is good to have records detailing the medical condition since Social Security usually checks with doctors, teachers and therapists to ensure there really is a disability. [/p] [list-ul type="arrow"] [li-row]Income: SSI guidelines consider income as anything that a person receives that can be used for food or shelter. Income can also be considered earned or unearned and there are some things that do not count for SSI purposes. Earned income includes wages from employment (including self-employment) and includes wages from sheltered workshop day programs. Unearned income includes Social Security benefits, workers or veterans compensation, pensions, annuities, rent, and interest from bank accounts. Social Security employees have tables when figuring out what the SSI benefits will be for the individual. A larger amount of earned income is not counted when calculating the SSI payment compared to the unearned income that is counted. There are also certain amounts of income per month that Social Security will not count in calculating income. [/li-row] [li-row]Resources: SSI guidelines count an individual's resources (or assets) for SSI determination (because remember we are looking at income and resources) when applying for SSI and he or she must have resources that total no more than $2,000 ($3,000 for a couple). What is not considered a countable resource in SSI eligibility? Some examples are a primary home, one car, household goods and personal belongings and burial plots.[/li-row] [/list-ul] [/two-third] [one-third last="true"] [/one-third] [/tab] [tab title="Parent Assets"] [two-third last="false"]

What about Parent's Assets in determining SSI eligibility?

[p]Are parent's income and resources of an underage child counted when determining SSI eligibility? The answer is yes, they usually are. Currently if the disabled child is unmarried and living at home, Social Security may consider some of the parent’s income as the child’s income after making allowances for the parents and other children living in the home. If the disabled child is unmarried and living at home and the parents’ resources are over $3,000 (or 2,000 if a single parent) then any income over this amount may be considered the resources of the child. At age 18 though things change. Your assets are typically not counted and only their income and resources are counted. However, if you adult disabled child lives at home with you then their base SSI payment will be reduced by one-third since the government will deem you responsible for paying for food and shelter. [/p] [/two-third] [one-third last="true"] [/one-third] [/tab] [tab title="SSI Points"] [two-third last="false"]

SSI Points to remember

[p]Remember these important SSI points:[/p] [one-half last=false] [list-ul type="arrow"] [li-row]Anyone who receives SSI must report all changes that affect eligibility or the payout amount. And currently reporting must occur within 10 days after the month during which the change occurred. [/li-row] [li-row]If you live in your own place and pay your own food and shelter costs, regardless of whether you own or rent, you may get up to the maximum SSI amount payable in your State. You also can get up to the maximum if you live in someone else's household as long as you pay your food and shelter costs. If you live in someone else's household and don't pay your food and shelter costs or pay only part of your food and shelter costs, your SSI benefit may be reduced by up to one–third of the SSI Federal benefit rate. [/li-row] [li-row]If you have too many assets you should consult an attorney to determine if there is anything you can do to reduce the amount of countable resources in a legal manner. [/li-row] [li-row]It may be possible to get conditional SSI payments if you agree to sell some of your countable resources but be sure to talk to an attorney and work with you local SS office. [/li-row][/list-ul] [/one-half] [one-half last=true] [list-ul type="arrow"] [li-row]SSI redeterminations are a review of whether SSI benefits are proper. Again by keeping good records concerning income and resources, living arrangements and disability history will make the redetermination go smoothly. Some redeterminations can be done by mail while others will require a visit to the Social Security office.[/li-row] [li-row]You should apply for SSI as soon as you think the individual is eligible. [/li-row] [li-row]Check out the SSI website for more information. [/li-row] [/list-ul] [/one-half] [/two-third] [one-third last="true"] [/one-third] [/tab]

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What is SSDI?

[p]SSDI is a government program that pays benefits to adults who have a disability which began before the age of 22 years of age. The benefit is based on a parent’s Social Security earning record. In order for a disabled adult to be entitled to this benefit, one of his or her parents must be receiving Social Security retirement or disability benefits or have died and have worked long enough under Social Security requirements.[/p] [/two-third] [one-third last="true"] [/one-third]
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Eligibility for SSDI

[p]Again, the benefit is based on a parent’s Social Security earning record. What is good is that there is no resource test for SSDI but they do look at earnings from employment. If the disabled adult does work then they cannot have substantial earnings in order to be eligible for SSDI benefits under the parent’s Social Security earnings. Currently an adult child can work and earn less than $1,010 per month and still receive benefits but this should be checked with your local Social Security office.[clear]

So what if your adult child already receives SSI, how does that impact SSDI benefits? Well, if he or she is already receiving SSI and is now entitled to SSDI benefits then you should check with Social Security office as the SSDI benefits under the parent’s Social Security earnings may be higher than what your adult child is receiving under SSI. Additionally, if the disabled adult can be able to collect SSDI under the parent’s Social Security earnings record then it should be checked whether he or she is entitled to Medicare coverage.
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Steps to take regarding SSDI

[p]See more information on Social Security benefits, then visit www.ssa.gov. You can apply by calling 1-800-772-1213 or contacting your local Social Security office.
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[one-half last=false] [list-ul type="arrow"] [li-row]Determine which benefits the individual with special needs would be entitled to going to: SS Screening Tool. [/li-row] [/list-ul] [/one-half] [one-half last=true] [list-ul type="arrow"] [li-row]If denied, seek legal counsel or see the SS Appeal site online.[/li-row] [/list-ul] [/one-half]
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[big-title2]Kokua Network goes to great lengths to provide accurate information. Kokua Network is not rendering legal, tax, accounting or other professional advice or services and you should talk to a attorney, accountant or any other professional local to your area who is knowledgeable of the rules and regulations that apply in your unique situation. Kokua Network should be used as a general guide only.[/big-title2]